‘Phone porting’ is a legitimate service that lets you transfer your mobile number and SIM card information from one telecommunications provider to another without changing or losing your original number.

UNAUTHORISED PHONE PORTING

‘Unauthorised phone porting’ happens when a criminal contacts a new telecommunications provider, sets up an account with them pretending to be you, and requests to have your number transferred from your current provider.

 

Many attacks happen at inconvenient times when you’re less likely to act fast (like late on a Friday night).

Watch out for the signs

YOUR MOBILE PHONE NUMBER AND SIM CARD COULD BE AT RISK IF:

  • Your mobile goes to SOS mode only.

  • You receive a text message saying your phone number is being transferred.

  • You’re locked out of accounts such as internet banking, emails, or other accounts that rely on password reset/verification codes.

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WHAT'S AT STAKE?

After your phone loses access to your mobile phone service provider, criminals act fast to receive text messages with reset/verification codes (often called two-factor authentication messages) to try and gain access to any account you have associated with your phone number.

Most attacks are directed at bank accounts (according to ACCAN and ANU research) including your savings mortgage, credit card and superannuation accounts. They also target social media accounts.

It can all begin with theft of your personal mail from your home letterbox, giving criminals information on your accounts with financial institutions and other organisations.

The consequences aren’t just financial

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It takes over 30 hours to recover your accounts and re protect them and recover all your accounts after an incident
(Source: ID Care)
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Your stolen ID can compromise your  credit rating regardless of your age - meaning a criminal can apply for credit, mortgages or debt under your name
 
(Source  ID care)
Stressed Woman
The worry and emotional stress can be huge - some people say they feel stupid, guilty or violated 

(Source: ACCAN and ANU research)